Romeo And Juliet Act 3 Scene 1 Essay Help

Romeo And Juliet Act 3 Scene 1 Essay Help-68
He asks that until Tybalt knows the reason for this love, he put aside his sword.Mercutio angrily draws his sword and declares with biting wit that if Romeo will not fight Tybalt, he will. Romeo, attempting to restore peace, throws himself between the combatants.Mercutio’s response to his fate, however, is notable in the ways it diverges from Romeo’s response.

He asks that until Tybalt knows the reason for this love, he put aside his sword.Mercutio angrily draws his sword and declares with biting wit that if Romeo will not fight Tybalt, he will. Romeo, attempting to restore peace, throws himself between the combatants.Mercutio’s response to his fate, however, is notable in the ways it diverges from Romeo’s response.

Tags: 5 Paragraph Essay SampleCreative Writing Workshops For KidsExamples Of Definition EssayHelp On College Essay QuestionsPurpose Of Thesis IntroductionWe Wear The Mask Poem Essay

Enraged, Romeo declares that his love for Juliet has made him effeminate, and that he should have fought Tybalt in Mercutio’s place.

When Tybalt, still angry, storms back onto the scene, Romeo draws his sword. Benvolio urges Romeo to run; a group of citizens outraged at the recurring street fights is approaching.

As they walk in the street under the boiling sun, Benvolio suggests to Mercutio that they go indoors, fearing that a brawl will be unavoidable should they encounter Capulet men. Tybalt turns his attention from Mercutio to Romeo, and calls Romeo a villain.

Mercutio replies that Benvolio has as quick a temper as any man in Italy, and should not criticize others for their short fuses. He approaches Benvolio and Mercutio and asks to speak with one of them. Romeo, now secretly married to Juliet and thus Tybalt’s kinsman, refuses to be angered by Tybalt’s verbal attack. Romeo protests that he has good reason to love Tybalt, and does not wish to fight him.

The arrival of the Prince and the angry citizens shifts the focus of the play to a different sort of public sphere.

Romeo’s killing of Tybalt is marked by rashness and vengeance, characteristics prized by noblemen, but which threaten the public order that citizens desire and the Prince has a responsibility to uphold.Tybalt stabs Mercutio under Romeo’s arm, and as Mercutio falls, Tybalt and his men hurry away.Mercutio dies, cursing both the Montagues and the Capulets: “A plague o’ both your houses” (3.1.87), and still pouring forth his wild witticisms: “Ask for me tomorrow, and / you shall find me a grave man” (3.1.93–94).The viciousness and dangers of the play’s social environment are dramatic tools that Shakespeare employs to make the lovers’ romance seem even more precious and fragile—their relationship is the audience’s only respite from the brutal world pressing against their love. ” refers specifically to his unluckiness in being forced to kill his new wife’s cousin, thereby getting himself banished (3.1.131).The fights between Mercutio and Tybalt and then between Romeo and Tybalt are chaotic; Tybalt kills Mercutio under Romeo’s arm, flees, and then suddenly, and inexplicably, returns to fight Romeo, who kills him in revenge. It also recalls the sense of fate that hangs over the play.When Benvolio says “I pray thee, good Mercutio, let’s retire, the heat has every one wound up”, it shows that Shakespeare sets the day as being a hot day, where the heat represents anger, which represents agitation.The weather had to be mentioned because in those days there were no special effects to represent the weather.This scene is quite a contrast to the previous one, whereas the previous one was happy, because Romeo and Juliet were married in secret by Friar Lawrence, who said that their marriage would end the feud, ‘FRIAR LAWRENCE: These violent delights have violent ends, And in their triumph die like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume.’ Friar Lawrence states here that the feud will die like a fire, it will be snuffed out as Romeo and Juliet kiss. It starts off with Mercutio and Benvolio joking around, with Benvolio telling Mercutio to go back home, because the Capulets are about, and they might get into a brawl, and Mercutio replies using his wit, asking how Benvolio, a man who could get into a fight with anyone, over almost anything, could lecture him about not getting into a quarrel with someone. Next follows the scene in which Tybalt enters, and asks for Romeo, but everything that he says, Mercutio finds another meaning for it and uses his words against him. As one who has displayed such traits, Romeo is banished from Verona.Earlier, the Prince acted to repress the hatred of the Montagues and the Capulets in order to preserve public peace; now, still acting to avert outbreaks of violence, the Prince unwittingly acts to thwart the love of Romeo and Juliet.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Romeo And Juliet Act 3 Scene 1 Essay Help

The Latest from zaveta.ru ©