Using Quotes In Essays

Whenever you change the original words of your source, you must indicate that you have done so.

Otherwise, you would be claiming the original author used words that he or she did not use. You could accidentally change the meaning of the quotation, and falsely claim the author said something they did not.

However, just skipping it would not work -- the final sentence would not make sense without it. In order to do so, you will need to use some editing symbols.

Your quotation might end up looking like this: In his essay, “United Shareholders of America,” Jacob Weisberg insists that “The citizen-investor serves his fellow citizens badly by his inclination to withdraw from the community. by focusing his pursuit of happiness on something that very seldom makes people happy in the way they expect it to.” The brackets around the word [money] indicate that you have substituted that word for other words the author used.

Using quotes in essays can be a great way to make your paper stand out above the rest.

However, it can also cost you marks if you don’t do it right.

Keep only the material that is strictly relevant to your own ideas.

So here you would not want to quote the middle sentence, since it is repeated again in the more informative last sentence.

Although it stood with its head raised, even its yellowed wings had been eaten by insects.

He thought of his entire life and felt tears and cruel laughter welling up inside. With this gesture Akutagawa ironizes the impossibility of truly writing the self by emphasizing the inevitable split that must occur between writing and written “self,” the Akutagawa still writing “A Fool's Life” cannot possibly be identical with the narrated persona which has finished the work.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Using Quotes In Essays

The Latest from zaveta.ru ©